Covid-19 Data as of May 16, 2022

Click on the image below for data for all 13 counties in District 2.

EPI SUMMARY: Data source Georgia DPH and SendSS. Cases include all confirmed and probable cases. Population data source Oasis, 2019. Time frame as of 11/06/2020 to 5/12/2022. Vaccines introduced 12/19/2020 –decline noted in cases after vaccine implementation. Vaccine data includes number of vaccines administered in each county in District 2 and vaccines administered per 100,000 (of the total county population). Vaccine data also shows number of one dose received and percentage of residents as well as 2 doses received, and percentage of residents vaccinated.

  • Graph above shows weekly changes in COVID cases. The case rate reported in the graph is approximately half of the 14-day case rate.
  • Vaccine graph shows percentage of individuals vaccinated by age group.

Georgia Flu Surveillance Update: Week 18

Week 18 – Ending May 07, 2022

As of Week 18, Georgia flu activity is minimal= 2 (on the scale of 1-13). Activity levels are based on the percent of outpatient visits in Georgia due to Influenza-like illness during this timeframe.
For the corresponding week, the percentage of outpatient visits for Influenza-like Illness was 2.2%, the number of influenza-associated death was 0; the number of Metro Area Influenza Hospitalizations was 13; and reported Influenza Outbreak was 0.

Getting the flu shot is the best thing you can do to protect yourself and others.
District 2 health departments have flu vaccines available. Please contact your local health department for information on how to get your Flu vaccine at http://phdistrict2.org/contact-us/.

To learn more about how to protect yourself against flu, visit DPH website at https://dph.georgia.gov/epidemiology/influenza/seasonal-flu-influenza
and CDC website at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/

DPH Urges Parents to Talk to Their Pediatricians for Guidance During Baby Formula Shortage

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 17, 2022
CONTACT:
nancy.nydam@dph.ga.gov

Atlanta – The Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) is urging parents unable to find baby formula typically used for their child to contact their pediatrician about appropriate nutritional and safe feeding alternatives. Georgia WIC is working with WIC agencies statewide, local grocers and retailers, and formula manufacturers to help locate formula for clients, especially those in need of specialized formula.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is offering guidance for parents that are having difficulty finding baby formula:

  • Watering down baby formula is dangerous and can cause nutritional imbalances that may lead to serious health problems. Always mix formula as directed by the manufacturer.
  • Homemade baby formulas are not advised. While recipes may seem healthy, they are not safe and do not meet your baby’s nutritional needs.
  • Buy baby formula online but only from well-recognized distributors and pharmacies.
  • Be leery of ads on social media. You can check out a company’s reputation through the Better Business Bureau (BBB) at www.bbb.org.
  • Do not use imported formulas from other countries that are not reviewed by the FDA.
  • Only prepare the amount of formula you will use – throw out any infant formula that is left in the bottle after feeding your baby.
  • It is recommended that during the shortage you buy no more than a 10-day to two-week supply of formula.

For a complete list of AAP guidance and tips for finding formula during the shortage, visit healthychildren.org. Parents should not hesitate to talk to their pediatrician with any concerns about their baby’s health and nutrition.

WIC clients who need help finding formula or who have questions should contact their local WIC office or call 1-800-228-9173.

Georgia Attorney General Chris Carr is warning Georgia consumers to beware of price gouging and other scams in response to the nationwide baby formula shortage. Consumers can report scams and suspected price gouging to the Consumer Protection Division (CPD) by calling 404- 651-8600 or 1-800-869-1123. Georgians can also file a complaint online by visiting CPD’s website.

DPH will continue to monitor all information coming from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and formula manufacturers regarding the shortage and work to ensure Georgia babies have access to food and nutrition they need to grow healthy and strong.

Facts About Rabies

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 16, 2022

GAINESVILLE, GA – Although the occurrence of rabies among humans has declined noticeably over the years, the disease continues among wild animals. Encounters between wild animals and domestic pets, including some that involve people, sometimes occur in our area. These incidents of exposure are common but can be prevented if residents take precautions to protect themselves and their pets. People should always avoid contact with unfamiliar dogs, cats, and wild animals. This includes feeding or attempting to help an animal that appears injured. Maintaining current rabies vaccinations for your pets and keeping them away from wild animals is the best way to protect them. If you feed your pets outside, pick up any uneaten food so wild animals, including feral cats, will not be attracted to your property. Feral cats, unlike stray domesticated cats, are born in the wild and should be treated as wild animals. Do not attempt to capture or feed feral or stray cats. Leave them and other wild animals alone.

The Georgia Department of Natural Resources has rigid regulations that prohibit the keeping of wild and wild/domestic hybrid animals as pets. Some animals identified by these regulations are raccoons, skunks, coyotes, foxes, and bats; which also are common carriers of rabies. More information is available about wild animals on the DNR website http://www.georgiawildlife.com. If you see a wild animal acting strangely, avoid the animal and contact the DNR Ranger Hotline at: 1-800-241-4113.

Rabies is a viral infection transmitted in the saliva of infected mammals. The virus enters the central nervous system of the host causing an inflammation of the brain that is almost always fatal. The most common carriers of rabies in the United States are raccoons, skunks, coyotes, foxes and bats. Wildlife remains the most likely potential source of infection for both humans and domestic animals in the United States. Rabies is transmitted only when the virus is introduced into bite wounds, open cuts in the skin, or onto mucous membranes, such as the eyes or mouth. Rabies in humans can be prevented by eliminating exposures to rabid animals or by providing exposed persons prompt medical treatment. Post-exposure rabies treatment includes a series of vaccine injections. The treatment can be costly; however, it is extremely important because rabies is almost always fatal without it. Post-exposure vaccine can be found at all the major hospitals within District 2 and information about vaccine assistance programs can be obtained from your local Environmental Health Office.

Public health officials become involved in animal cases where exposure or potential exposure to rabies occurs. The role of public health is to ensure that domestic animals are vaccinated against rabies and to ensure the public is informed about rabies risks and the need to seek medical treatment.

There is no better time than now to ensure that all your pets are currently vaccinated. For more information about rabies, ask your veterinarian, local health department or go to http://dph.georgia.gov/rabies.

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Covid-19 Data as of May 09, 2022

Click on the image below for information on all 13 counties in District 2.

EPI SUMMARY: Data source Georgia DPH and SendSS. Cases include all confirmed and probable cases. Population data source Oasis, 2019. Time frame as of 11/06/2020 to 5/5/2022. Vaccines introduced 12/19/2020 – decline noted in cases after vaccine implementation. Vaccine data includes number of vaccines administered in each county in District 2 and vaccines administered per 100,000 (of the total county population). Vaccine data also shows number of one dose received and percentage of residents as well as 2 doses received, and percentage of residents vaccinated.

  • Graph above shows weekly changes in COVID cases. The case rate reported in the graph is approximately half of the 14-day case rate.
  • Vaccine graph shows percentage of individuals vaccinated by age group.